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20 Lines or Less/ A Weekly Challenge/ Dreams/ Poem/“JOY” In the Afternoon

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“JOY” In the Afternoon

It was an afternoon nap.

I was so tired

Quickly, I was under.

It was snowing and the world was white.

The sun was bright in the crystallized sky.

Then,

A flash of red from the side-

A little bundle only a few feet high.

I watched in wonder

I smiled in awe.

Then, the little boy hit me…

With a snowball.

I laughed and asked his name.

He said it was something that started with a “J”.

Who are you? I asked again

He replied, “I am your JOY.”

My eyes flashed open and the dream was gone.

I was left with the feeling that “J”

Would be my future grandson.

Copyright © Jamie Nowinski and Grandmother Wisdom/ Grandmother Musings 2012-2013.

Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Jamie Nowinski – Grandmother Wisdom/Grandmother Musings with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

 

 

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FINISH THIS SENTENCE

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Teaching English and writing gives me a natural love of words, sentences, and paragraphs.   So when I found this little blurb in the back of the Reader’s Digest magazine, I found it fascinating and thought I’d put a challenge out to you!

Finish This Sentence:

The most beautiful words in the English language are…

Here are some examples that were published in the Reader’s Digest

“…-check enclosed”   Dorothy Parker

“…-play ball!”  President George H.W. Bush

“…I told you so.”  Gore Vidal

And mine….

“…I love you, Grandmother.”  Grandmother Musings

ADD YOUR WORDS!!

Copyright © Jamie Nowinski and Grandmother Wisdom/ Grandmother Musings 2012-2013.
Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Jamie Nowinski – Grandmother Wisdom/Grandmother Musings with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Our Deepest Fear

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The quote below is an actually excerpt from a book entitled” A Return To Love: Reflections on the Principles of A Miracles by Course by Marianne Williamson.  I read this quote for the first time in the doctor’s office.  It touched me to the core of my being, so much so, that I immediately picked up my smart phone and emailed the author and title to myself.  The words are the truest words, and they should resonate with each of us.

        “Our deepest fear is not that we are inadequate. Our deepest fear is that we are powerful beyond measure. It is our light, not our darkness that most frightens us. We ask ourselves, Who am I to be brilliant, gorgeous, talented, fabulous? Actually, who are you not to be? You are a child of God. Your playing small does not serve the world. There is nothing enlightened about shrinking so that other people won’t feel insecure around you. We are all meant to shine, as children do. We were born to make manifest the glory of God that is within us. It’s not just in some of us; it’s in everyone. And as we let our own light shine, we unconsciously give other people permission to do the same. As we are liberated from our own fear, our presence automatically liberates others.” 

When I think of how many times I have downplayed myself to others trying so hard not to be different.  Afraid, that if I let others know of my talents, they would shun me from the group, because I was not the same as them.  That possibly, I was too talented, and that talent would hurt others or make them feel like they were less than I was.

My light does frighten others and me; I have learned.  Consequently, I question this idea as Marianne Williams does in her book.  If, I am a product of God and have been given all these wondrous talents, then would it be a rebuff to God if I choose not to use them?  If I am born with these gifts, there must be a purpose for them, a use.  I must strive to incorporate them into my life and not be ashamed or fearful of the gifts.

I was once told that I was a “Reluctant Leader” because I have the ability to lead others, but choose to stand back and see if someone else will take the lead. The decision is “safe” without a chance at failure or ridicule. However, I think that rather than be afraid to use my talents, I should find ways to share them and be the inspiration for others, even if it means I may fail sometimes.

Since, the gifts are from God, is it sane to think that God will provide a way to incorporate these gifts into the world for good? What talents do I possess that I keep selfishly to myself?  Just a few thoughts I thought to share. What do you think?  Are you playing small?

Copyright © Jamie Nowinski and Grandmother Wisdom/ Grandmother Musings 2012-2013.
Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Jamie Nowinski – Grandmother Wisdom/Grandmother Musings with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Lying Eyes

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Pinocchio was a wooden boy who made his father’s job easy.  Whenever Pinocchio lied, his nose grew longer.  If only parents and teachers had the benefit of a growing nose to warn them that a lie was coming. There are strategies that can help parents and teachers avoid the potential lies from their children and get to the truth.

1.  Avoid asking questions.  If you suspect a child of lying, do not ask questions like why? or did you?  State the act you suspect them of doing directly.

Example:  “Adam, I do not want you to swear like that, again. I am disappointed in your choice of words.  There will be no more TV for you this evening”

By making the statement, the child has less time to make up a lie. The statement catches the child off guard, and generally, he or she will admit to the act.  If the child truly did not swear, the reaction and body language will let you know that the child is innocent of the crime.

2.  Pay close attention to eye contact.  Liars will avoid direct eye contact.  One way to tell if the child is lying is to observe whether the child looks at you when you confront him or her with the offense.  If the child is young, this strategy is telling, however older children may be accomplished at lying and look you directly in the eye.  Nevertheless, there are still little telltale signs such as erratic blinking or moving the eyes from side to side to identify a lie.

3. Watch for body language.  Blushing or red flushed skin can be a sign that the child is not giving the whole truth.  Some children will touch their nose or face when they are lying, while others will fidget and wring their hands.  Lying makes people nervous and this nervousness is a good sign that something is not right.

4. Is the child being overly defensive?  Often, when a liar is confronted their first reaction is to be defensive.  The child may blame another for the infraction or try to make the adult feel guilty for asking.  This should make the adult stop and ponder what the child is trying to hide.

5. Catch the child in the act.  The best way to catch a liar is to observe them doing the act. This may take a bit of patience and time on the part of the adult, but it is a good way to stop an habitual liar when other methods are not working.

The ultimate goal of parents and teachers should be to teach the child that lying is not the answer.  If the child learns to admit when he or she has made a mistake and how to accept the consequences, the instances of lying can be eliminated as well as the unacceptable behavior.  

Copyright © Jamie Nowinski and Grandmother Wisdom/ Grandmother Musings 2012-2013.
Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Jamie Nowinski – Grandmother Wisdom/Grandmother Musings with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.
 

Mega, Extreme Dinosaur Lover

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My grandson has been obsessed with dinosaurs since he was two years old.  He knows every name, in Greek and Latin terms, and every tiny description and fact about dinosaurs.  He has a robotic T-Rex, and scores of triceratops, Diplodocus, and velociraptors, sitting on his shelves in his bedroom.  He reads encyclopedias of dinosaurs and watches every movie ever made about them.  He is infatuated with these extinct creatures.

For his birthday, my grandson’s parents took him to the Field Museum to see the exhibit that housed the famous T-Rex, Sue.  They spent the night at the museum, sleeping amongst the dinosaurs in their sleeping bags.   My grandson met with other kids who were also enamored with dinos and they ran and giggled as the huge beasts watched. He was in heaven.

I do not remember ever being so besotted with any one thing in the same way my grandson is smitten with dinosaurs.  I know my son loved choo-choo trains when he was little, and then he liked fire engines, Lego’s, Nintendo, and… However, my grandson does not seem to be willing to leave the dinosaur craze behind him.  He has become interested in Godzilla, but it is only a made up creature similar to a dinosaur. Oh, and he likes Lego’s now, but he made me buy the new dinosaur collection.

A friend of mine insinuated that maybe there was something wrong with my grandson’s fanatical love of dinosaurs.  However, I do not agree.  I think it is great that he is able to stick with one thing and really study it.  His preoccupation keeps him entertained and using his imagination.  What could be so bad with that?

Who knows? Maybe he will grow up to be a scientist, zoologist, or a paleontologist.  Possibly, with his skill and passion for looking in-depth at things, he could find a cure for cancer or unearth answers to world problems.  Or else, he could become an awesome Dad who can have interesting conversations with his own son about dinosaurs.  Whatever he does with his life, I am sure that he will do it with zeal and curiosity, and I will be extremely proud of him.

Do you know any children who are obsessed with something?  Feel free to share your story.

Copyright © Jamie Nowinski and Grandmother Wisdom/ Grandmother Musings 2012-2013.

Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Jamie Nowinski – Grandmother Wisdom/Grandmother Musings with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.
 

30 Days of Gratitude

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Day Thirty: Justice. Do you judge others or situations fairly?  Are you able to keep an open mind and take all the facts into consideration before you judge?  How grateful are you when you have been judged fairly?

Copyright © Jamie Nowinski and Grandmother Wisdom/ Grandmother Musings 2012-2013.
Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Jamie Nowinski – Grandmother Wisdom/Grandmother Musings with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

30 Days of Gratitude

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Day Twenty-nine:  Adventures.  Life is all about the adventures we take and what we learn from them.  What recent adventure have you been on?  What knowledge did you gain?

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