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Positive News is Out There!

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Are you tired of seeing depressing news stories on the local news? Is it possible that more than BAD stuff is happening in the world? Here is an article I found at a website called www.sunnyskyz.com and at this site there are lots of positive news articles to enjoy. Here is one entitled, “She Asked her 80-Year-Old Grandma to be a Bridesmaid It Turned Out Better Than She Ever Expected”
http://www.sunnyskyz.com/good-news/1266/She-Asked-Her-89-Year-Old-Grandma-To-Be-A-Bridesmaid-It-Turned-Out-Better-Than-She-Ever-Expected

Have an enjoyable and positive day! smiley laughing

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It Is Almost Time

It is almost time for the big day.

There are last-minute errands and phone calls to make.

Nerves are strung tight and frayed.

Excitement is building.

By this time next week, it will all be a memory.

I want to cry every time I think about him.

I remember cuddling, story books, and dinnertime.

Now, he is all grown up and independent.

Soon he will have a family of his own.

Time flew by too fast and forgot to stop.

I will try not to cry during the ceremony.

I will smile and greet the guests with pride.

Saturday will be a grand day.

The occasion where my sons says, “I do” with his bride.

 

 

 

Grandmother Musings 2012-2013.
Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Jamie Nowinski – Grandmother Wisdom/Grandmother Musings with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.
 

A Rondel : A Wedding of Two Souls

Taken by: Mila Zinkova (original source)

On an autumn morning, with bright-colored cheeks,

She walks down the aisle of her life.

Her future stands at his side as his wife.

The circle of life begins as the priest speaks.

 

As her veil  lifted by hands that she knows,

The familiar flutter in her heart beats fast.

The gentle blue eyes of her husband slows,

As words of enduring love is asked.

 

Joyful music of celebration swirls around.

The dance of binding sways.

Molding two into one in a blaze.

The couple begins their life together bound.

Until their death and they are in the ground.

 

20 Lines or Less posted the challenge of writing a Rondel Poem, and I thought I would give it a try.  I used the theme of a wedding because that is what is currently on my mind. My son is getting married in October and the wedding preparations are being made as I write.  Only a few more weeks to go and there will be a wedding of two souls.

 

Rondel

A French form consisting of 13 lines: two quatrains and a quintet, rhyming as follows:

ABba abAB abbaA. The capital letters are the refrains, or repeats.

 

Related Articles
Trying a Rondel for the First Time
Another Challenge…Just for Fun

Grandmother Musings 2012-2013.
Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Jamie Nowinski – Grandmother Wisdom/Grandmother Musings with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Wedding Customs and Where They Originated

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Even though June is typically the “Wedding Month”, more and more couples are choosing non-traditional dates to “tie the knot”.  They are also concerned about keeping with the traditions that go along with getting married. Many of these traditions are deeply engrained in our culture and carry with them an interesting history of superstition, family, and of the era from which they originated.

Wedding Date

June wedding dates are historically the most popular month to marry, for it is named after the Roman Goddess of Marriage, Juno. According to legend, Juno would bring prosperity and happiness to all who wed in her month.  In the past, common sense also played a part in a bride’s decision to marry in June. If she marries in the early part of summer, the bride’s first child would likely arrive in spring, giving her time to recover before the fall harvest.

According to an article in “The Examiner” written by Marguerite Wright, “June was considered the time when people came outdoors after a long winter and bathed communally. This would be the best time for a fresh smelling bride.” Celebrations could be planned without the threat of acclimate weather and family could travel to attend the wedding.

Brides were also superstitious about the day of the week.  An old poem goes:

Marry on Monday for health,

Tuesday for wealth,

Wednesday the best day of all,

Thursday for crosses,

Friday for losses,

and Saturday for no luck at all.

The Sabbath day was out of the question.

Wedding Dress

The tradition of wearing a white or ivory wedding dress comes from Victorian Age (1837-1901).  White or ivory wedding dresses worn by the rich, who could afford to wear a dress only once, were in vogue.  It was also considered a sign of purity and virginity.

A black wedding dress was considered taboo in the past, however, today black, and many other colors have been added to the selections. Vera Wang, a popular fashion designer, displayed only black wedding dresses in her 2012 collection. David’s Bridal reports that colored dresses have begun to come into fashion for younger brides.

A Wedding Dress poem steeped in superstition, but something to think about before the wedding.

Married in white, you will have chosen right.  

Married in grey, you will go far away.

Married in black, you will wish yourself back.

Married in red, you wish yourself dead.

Married in green, ashamed to be seen.

Married in blue, you will always be true.

Married in pearl, you will live in a whirl.

Married in yellow, ashamed of your fellow.

Married in brown, you will live out-of-town.

Married in pink, your fortune will sink.

 

The Veil and the Bridesmaids

The reason and purpose for a veil for the Bride and her Bridesmaids comes for the ancient belief that evil spirits were lurking at the wedding and trying to steal the soul of the Bride. If the Bride wears a veil, as well as her Bridesmaids, the evil spirits will be confused and not know whom to choose.  Essentially, the Bridesmaids were put in place to protect the Bride and ensure that her soul was pure when she was given to her Groom.

 

Other Superstitions and Customs

Something Old,

Something New,

Something Borrowed,

Something Blue

Many Brides’ have searched frantically before the Wedding Day to find an item to fit each of the items in this phrase.  This poem came from Ancient Roman symbolism.  “Something Old…” means continuing with the past; “Something New…” was the sign of future prosperity; “Something Borrowed…” usually came from another happy couple to ensure that their happiness would rub off on the newlyweds and that they would also be happy together; “Something Blue…” was associated with purity, fidelity, and true love.

The superstition of carrying the Bride over the threshold by the groom stems from those evil spirits lurking, again. Even today in Eastern Europe, the wedding guests still escort the bride and groom to their bedroom.  Some cultures will dance around the house of the newlyweds to drive away any demons that may be hanging around.

With all these ceremonies and banishing of evil spirits, it is a wonder married couples ever have troubles or divorce. It could be that in modern times, many of these superstitions and customs have fallen to the wayside.  Couples today are choosing to buck the tradition and marry in their own way.  Imagine what our ancestors would have believed about couples who choose to marry on Halloween or on Friday the 13th.  Talk about your evil spirits!  Nevertheless, the ceremony of marriage is still thought to be a time to celebrate and an occasion to wish the couple a happy life.

 

Related Articles

 A Brief History of Weddings

Something Blue

Wedding Traditions: Something Old, New, Borrowed, and Blue

 

Works Cited

American Wedding Traditions and Customs. (2012). Retrieved from Elite Dresses.com: http://www.elitedresses.com/American_Wedding_Customs_s/63.htm

Kitsen, M. L. (1998, May). How Wedding Customs Got Their Start. Women’s Day.

McIntyre, K. (2012). The History of the White Wedding Dress. Retrieved from From Times Past .com: http://www.fromtimespast.com/wedding.htm

Odell, A. (2011, 10 28). Just How Popular Are Colored Wedding Dresses? Retrieved from New York Fashion Magazine: http://nymag.com/daily/fashion/2011/10/colored_wedding_dresses.html

Wright, M. (2006-2012). Why June is the time for weddings and the best spas for brides. Retrieved from The Examiner.com: http://www.examiner.com/article/why-june-is-the-time-for-weddings-and-the-best-spas-for-brides

 

Copyright © Jamie Nowinski and Grandmother Wisdom/ Grandmother Musings 2012-2013.
Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Jamie Nowinski – Grandmother Wisdom/Grandmother Musings with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.
 
 

 

 

 

 

Quotes from the Masters: Bacon

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“We have only this moment, sparkling like a star in our hand–and melting like a snowflake.” Sir Francis Bacon     

This weekend my husband and I held a Wedding Shower for my son and his future bride.  Since they live four hours away, we had a difficult time coordinating a date, but settled for July 7.  Of course, the entire week before the party, it was in the 100’s and the heat wave broke all sorts of records. 

Consequently, we would work outside early morning and late afternoon.  When the sun was at its hottest, we would work in the house trying to get ready for the full house of company we would have for the weekend.  If we felt too over-heated  we would jump in the pool to cool down.  However, even the pool was having trouble keeping up with the heat.  After four days of high temperatures the water was 92 degrees and not quite as refreshing as it should have been. 

Our goal was to make things as cool for our guests as possible. The dress was casual because we knew it would be too hot to be formally dressed.  We had a shelter, lots of cool drinks (Sangria), good food, and an air-conditioned house for respite.

 On the morning of the shower, as we all began to set up for the party that was set for one in the afternoon, it was still 98 degrees.  Tempers flared as we attempted to set up the pop-up canopy and arrange the tables.  The prep work in the kitchen was set to a furious cacophony of women trying to prepare cheese, meat, and vegetable trays.  Everyone on duty was sweating and hot, but we worked together, so that when the first guests arrived, the place looked perfect.

 Then, the magic occurred.  As the future bride and groom opened their gifts, a swift breeze fluttered the top of the canopy. The flowers on the tables began to sway and a blessed cool wind came from the northwest.  All the guests turned instinctively toward the relief. “Ahhhs.” Were heard all around. 

 The wind had shifted bringing a cool front to the stifling heat.  The temperature dropped 10 degrees in fifteen minutes.  By the time all the presents were opened and the cake was being passed around, the guests were no longer asking for iced drinks, but for coffee to go with their cake. 

 The universe had chosen that moment to give us all a break from the oppressive heat and blow in happy wishes for the future bride and groom.  Never again will we be blessed to watch our son share this moment with his bride–to- be and his family and friends.  Similarly, as the quote from Sir Frances Bacon states, “We have only this moment, sparkling like a star in our hand- and melting like a snowflake.” Fortunately, none of us melted like a snowflake in the heat, but we did have the opportunity to view a couple, sparkling like the stars for a brief moment.

 View more Quotes from the Masters at Bringing Europe Home

 

 

 

Copyright © Jamie Nowinski and Grandmother Wisdom/ Grandmother Musings 2012-2013.
Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Jamie Nowinski – Grandmother Wisdom/Grandmother Musings with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

 

 

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