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Tag Archives: literature

First and Third: A lesson on Point of View

     Whenever you sit down to write a story or even when you are reading a story, point of view decides how the story is to be told.  Points of view are divided into two main groups: first-person and third-person.

     In the first-person point of view, the narrator is a character in the story that tells the story as he or she experiences or understands it.  It is easy to spot the use of first-person point of view due to the use of the pronouns: I, me, we, us, my, and our.  For example, a story begins, “I was starving and had not eaten in three days.  My stomach twisted and grumbled at my lack of food.” Is told from the first-person point of view.

     When a story is told from the first-person point of view, the reader only knows the inside of the narrator’s mind.  All other characters are given to the reader from the narrator’s perspective, what the character says, and how the character acts.  Readers have to decide from those three clues what the other characters in the story are thinking. If the narrator were a little crazy, then it would make sense that the reader is going to have a skewed vision of the other characters.

     In the third-person point of view, the narrator is not one of the characters in the story.  The narrator stand outside the story and looks in to refer to the characters as he, she, his, her, or they. When the narrator says, “He made a decision to purchase his lunch from a hot dog vendor.” It is being told from the third-person point of view.

     Within the third-person point of view, an author has the choice to choose either omniscient (ohm-nish-ent) point of view or limited omniscient point of view.  The difference is that in omniscient point of view the narrator has carte blanche and is all knowing.  He or she enters into the minds of all the characters and tells the reader all of their secret thoughts. The narrator understands everything about every character.  When an author uses limited omniscient point of view, he or she gets into the head of only a few of the characters and tells the story only from those character’s point of view.  Limited omniscient point of view can even stick to one character that the author highlights throughout the whole story.

     When writing a story it is a good idea to choose the point of view that will best compliment your characters and plot line.  If you want to keep your readers guessing, you may wish to use the first-person point of view, and if you need the reader to see the problem in the story from all the characters you may wish to use a form of third-person point of view.  Happy writing.

 

 

 

Grandmother Musings 2012-2013.
Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Jamie Nowinski – Grandmother Wisdom/Grandmother Musings with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

 

Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury

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Fahrenheit 451Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Fahrenheit 451 is a must read classic and an original dystopian novel. Ray Bradbury, who just recently passed away, was a prolific science fiction writer with over 500 pieces published. Fahrenheit 451, one of many celebrated books written by Bradbury, focuses on Guy Montag who is a fireman. The twist is that he starts fires rather than put them out. He is charged with the duty of burning books. For years, Montag has burned books. He says, “It was a pleasure to burn. It was a special pleasure to see things eaten, to see things blackened and changed.”
One day, Montag is called to burn the books of Mrs. Hudson. She refuses to allow her books to be set on fire. She would rather die than lose her books. Haunted by Mrs. Hudson’s convictions, Montag collects a few of the books that have been saved by the fire and takes them home. He begins to read them in secret and his perspective on life begins to change. Fueled by his growing dissatisfaction of his profession and the meaninglessness in his life he seeks out a man named Faber. Montag once gave Faber a light charge after being caught with books. Ironically, Faber and Montag agree to copy an old salvaged Bible to save its contents from being destroyed.
The book is separated into titled sections that seem to represent the changes in Montag. Censorship is the most prevalent theme of this story. It seems the government and society does not want information to reach the people. The only information comes from media that seems to suggest radio and TV. Amazingly, in Montag’s home, he has a room where three walls hold screened TV, and his wife cannot wait until they can afford to have all the walls covered. This is surprisingly similar to the huge flat screen TV’s that current society has in every room of their homes.
Another theme is knowledge versus ignorance where Montag was happy with his life before he was bestowed the knowledge of reading. It is impossible to put the knowledge aside once he has it in his possession. It changes his beliefs and his life.
The writing style Bradbury incorporates into Fahrenheit 451 is a more formal style than what people are familiar with today. Published in 1953, the novel is often used by high schools and colleges. Francois Truffaut wrote and directed a film adaptation of the book in 1966, and it is available on DVD.
This novel’s themes are relevant today for it seems that many of Bradbury’s visions of the future have materialized in society. Thoughts and musings on these themes will haunt the reader long after he or she has finished the novel. Read this book!

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Copyright © Jamie Nowinski and Grandmother Wisdom/ Grandmother Musings 2012-2013.
Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Jamie Nowinski – Grandmother Wisdom/Grandmother Musings with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

The Beautiful Blogger Award

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The Beautiful Blogger Award

The nominated recipients are asked to:

  • ·       Thank and Link-back to your nominator…
Grandmothermusings is blessed and grateful to be nominated for the Beautiful Blogger Award by Yellowlancer at Positive Word Magazine. She is one of the first blogs I started following just three months ago when I began my own blog.  Positive Word Magazine always posts fascinating photos and prompts to shake-up the creative juices.
  • ·       Nominate 7 (or more) other blogs that you enjoy to receive this award as well;
  • ·       Post a comment on each of your nominees blogs with a link to your page for the details;
  • ·       Paste the Award image somewhere on your blog, if so desired;
  • ·       In addition, continue blogging all your beautiful thoughts, suggestions, and musings. More readers are coming!
It is very difficult to choose seven nominees from all the wonderful blogs I follow. I have listed some of my newest follower’s blogs below, and I hope you enjoy looking at their blogs as much as I do:
  1.   I.        Word by Word Superbly written book reviews and quotes. Love it!
  2. II.        Knowthesphere Deep thoughts and his excellent writing style keep me going back.
  3. III.        Omnomalicious  Superb place for superb recipes.
  4. IV.        Mydearbakes Wonderful 3-D cake models.
  5. V.        Preservation in Pink  A site featuring great historic preservations pictured with interesting facts.
  6. VI.        MaggieMaeI justsaythis Poetry and stories that always fascinate the reader with their truth.
  7. VII.        Evoking the Deep  Love to read Scott’s stories.
Enjoy everyone! 🙂

 

 

Copyright © Jamie Nowinski and Grandmother Wisdom/ Grandmother Musings 2012-2013.
Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Jamie Nowinski – Grandmother Wisdom/Grandmother Musings with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.
 

 

It’s A Punny Day

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Puns, a form of word play, are used to create humor and often require a large vocabulary to understand.  You will know a pun as soon as you hear it and get the meanings.  They usually make the listener groan…ugh.  Newscasters love to use puns as do comedians and writers.  Some famous people like William Shakespeare and George Carlin are known for their puns. Puns were also found in ancient Egypt, where they were heavily used in development of myths and interpretation of dreams.

Below are a few puns, some are mine and a few are from other “punsters”.  Feel free to share your favorite puns.

1.    I had a pool of thoughts concerning the recent economic downturn; however, they cannot hold water with the new statistics.             Jamie Nowinski

 2.  White collars are clean because blue collars do all the dirty work.       Jamie Nowinski

 3.  “No, ’tis not so deep as a well, nor so wide as a church-door, but ’tis enough, ’twill serve: ask for me tomorrow, and you shall find me a grave man.” Romeo and Juliet (Act iii, S.1)

 4.   I used to work in a blanket factory, but it folded.             www.DigitalDreamDoor.com

 5.  I made wine out of raisins so I wouldn’t have to wait for it to age. Stephen Wright

 6.  Energizer Bunny arrested – charged with battery.               www.DigitalDreamDoor.com

  7.  When you dream in color, it’s a pigment of your imagination.             www.DigitalDreamDoor.com

 8.  Two fish swim into a concrete wall. One turns to the other and says Dam!’  www.DigitalDreamDoor.com

 9.  Two hydrogen atoms meet. One says, ‘I’ve lost my electron.’ The other says ‘Are you sure?’ The first replies, ‘Yes, I’m positive.’  www.DigitalDreamDoor.com

 10.  And then there was the person who sent ten puns to friends, with the hope that at least one of the puns would make them laugh. No pun in ten did.  www.DigitalDreamDoor.com

 

Copyright © Jamie Nowinski and Grandmother Wisdom/ Grandmother Musings 2012-2013.
Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Jamie Nowinski – Grandmother Wisdom/Grandmother Musings with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.
 

 

 

 

 

Unbroken: A World War II Story of Survival, Resilience, and Redemption by Laura Hillenbrand

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Unbroken: A World War II Story of Survival, Resilience and RedemptionUnbroken: A World War II Story of Survival, Resilience and Redemption by Laura Hillenbrand

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

This is one of the most fascinating biography books; I have ever read. Written like a fiction novel, it relates the story of Louis Zamperini, a former Olympic Track star who survives World War II as a hero.

Zamperini possesses a unique spirit and grit that allows him to survive his plane being shot down over the Pacific, 47 days adrift on a raft with two companions, and the internment in notorious Japanese POW camps. His quick mind and nimble body suffer untold horrors throughout his ordeals. Especially when Louie meets up with an evil Japanese jailor named “The Bird”.

Hillenbrand, the author, has extensively researched and interviewed Zamperini’s life. The book includes many photos, that have been saved by the Zamperini family and many illustrious stories of Louie. Laura Hillenbrand interviewed Louie 75 times and retells his life in a positive and descriptive story-like fashion.

You do not need to be a World War II buff to enjoy this amazing story of heroism, America, and survival. Read this book today!

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Copyright © Jamie Nowinski and Grandmother Wisdom/ Grandmother Musings 2012-2013.
Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Jamie Nowinski – Grandmother Wisdom/Grandmother Musings with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

The Giver by Lois Lowery

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The Giver (The Giver, #1)The Giver by Lois Lowry

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

If you like dystopian stories like The Hunger Games, you will love The Giver. This young adult novel written by Lois Lowery is set in the future where everything is “sameness”. The main character in the story is Jonas, a 12-year-old who has been assigned his life’s profession as a Receiver of the community’s memories.

In Jonas’ community, you apply for your mate, and apply for children. Birthmothers whose assignment in the community is only to have babies for three years birth children. The elderly and those who are not perfect are chosen for “release”.

The book has won The 1994 Newberry Award, and the American Library Association named it as one of the 100 Most Challenged books.

This book deals with the ideas of sexuality, war, and controlled societies. It is listed as a Young Adult Novel; however, it is written so well, that adults will enjoy the story, too. Lois Lowery weaves a tale that makes you think deeply about even it after you have put the book down.

View all my reviews

Copyright © Jamie Nowinski and Grandmother Wisdom/ Grandmother Musings 2012-2013.
Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Jamie Nowinski – Grandmother Wisdom/Grandmother Musings with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.
 

The Devil in the White City: Murder, Magic, and Madness at the Fair That Changed America by Erik Larson

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The Devil in the White City: Murder, Magic, and Madness at the Fair that Changed AmericaThe Devil in the White City: Murder, Magic, and Madness at the Fair that Changed America by Erik Larson

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

This non-fiction book reads like a great mystery novel. It won me over immediately due to its setting of Chicago in 1893. This was at the time of The World’s Fair (The World’s Columbian Exposition) and the great architect Daniel H. Burnham who created the “Great White City”.

The book revolves around Herman Webster Mudgett (aka Dr. H.H. Holmes) who lured his victims from the fair and murdered them. This serial killer even built his own building, “The World’s Fair Hotel” with a plan to gas the victims in the gas chamber, dissect them at the dissection table, and rid himself of the bodies in the crematorium. Dr. Holmes often removed the skeletons of his victims and sold them for medical and scientific study. Many of those skeletons may have been used in medical colleges and hospitals.

The interesting thing about this book is how the author wove this story of murder and mayhem with the story of the architect Daniel Burnham. The reader is given insight to the character and dream of Burnham and of the politics that went into creating a World’s Fair.

This excellent book leaves the reader hungry for more. Leonardo Di Caprio purchased the film rights to this book in 2010. Word is that a movie starring Di Caprio is in production. No word as to when it might be released. If the movie is half as good as the book, it will be a blockbuster.

View all my reviews

Copyright © Jamie Nowinski and Grandmother Wisdom/ Grandmother Musings 2012-2013.
Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Jamie Nowinski – Grandmother Wisdom/Grandmother Musings with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.
 
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