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Quotes From the Masters: Hugo

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Marigolds

Marigolds make great companions to other plants in your garden. Just ask any farmer or gardener and they will tell you to plant marigolds to keep those pesky rabbits and annoying insects out of your prized vegetables.  The pests hate the smell.  Nematodes (microscopic worms) and other organisms run from the marigold’s roots underground, and they will stay away for up to three years.

No annual is easier to grow than marigolds.  They are a cheerful plant that is hardy and will typically grow anywhere, but like well-drained soil the best.  They will bloom all season long right up to the first snowfall in some cases.  Marigolds are generally, yellow, orange and red, and are a perfect tribute to your fall garden.

According to Herbalists at MDidea Extracts, “The marigold or Calendula flower was well-known to the old herbalists as a garden flower that also could be used for culinary or healing practices. It has been cultivated in the kitchen garden for the flowers, which are dried for broth, and said to comfort the heart and spirits.”

During the American Civil War, field doctors used the flowers of the marigold to accelerate healing in open wounds, promote blood clotting, cleanse the tissue, and prevent infection. The practice of using marigolds to heal soldiers continued until World War I. 

The Old Farmer’s Almanac shares some “Wit & Wisdom” about marigolds in its 2012 edition by telling how, in the late 1960s, Burpee president David Burpee launched an energetic campaign to have marigolds named the national flower, but in the end, roses won out.  In addition, they explain that for years, farmers have included the open-pollinated African marigold ‘Crackerjack’ in chicken feed to make egg yolks a darker yellow.

In short, Victor Hugo is correct when he states “Nature, like a kind and smiling mother, lends herself to our dreams and cherishes our fancies.”  For the marigold smiles at us with her beautiful buds of sunshine, protects our dreams of good food and health, and can adorn any patio with pure fancy.

******* Please Visit Bringing Europe Home to view more “Quotes From The Masters”

Works Cited

Marigolds: how to Plant, Care, and Grow Marigolds. (2012). Retrieved from Old Farmer’s Almanac: http://www.almanac.com/plant/marigolds

What is Marigold or Calendula extract? (2010, Dec. 1). Retrieved from MDidea Extracts Professional: http://www.mdidea.com/products/herbextract/marigold/data06.html

Why Plant Marigolds in your Vegetable Garden? (2007, Dec 7). Retrieved from ToadStool Aquaponics: http://toadstoolponds.wordpress.com/2007/12/07/why-plant-marigolds-in-your-vegetable-garden/

 

Copyright © Jamie Nowinski and Grandmother Wisdom/ Grandmother Musings 2012-2013.
Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Jamie Nowinski – Grandmother Wisdom/Grandmother Musings with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

 

Do you know your Memorial Day history?

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It is Memorial Day Eve.  Sgt. York, a great movie about a World War I hero is playing on the TV.  During a commercial break, my grandson asks me what Memorial Day is and why we celebrate the day. This inspired me to do a little research concerning the history of Memorial Day, and how Americans came to celebrate it. I found out some interesting information that I shared with my grandson and I thought my reader’s would also be interested in reading the reasons why Memorial Day is observed.

Sgt. York (1941)

Memorial Day was originally called Decoration Day and was a day declared three years after the Civil War to honor the deceased soldier’s graves with flowers. “Maj. Gen. John A. Logan declared that Decoration Day should be observed on May 30. It is believed that date was chosen because flowers would be in bloom all over the country.”

“Gen. Logan’s order for his posts to decorate graves in 1868 “with the choicest flowers of springtime” urged:

“We should guard their graves with sacred vigilance. … Let pleasant paths invite the coming and going of reverent visitors and fond mourners. Let no neglect, no ravages of time, testify to the present or to the coming generations that we have forgotten as a people the cost of a free and undivided republic.”

According to an article in Military.com, the crowd attending the first Memorial Day ceremony at Arlington National Cemetery was approximately the same size as those that attend today’s observance, about 5,000 people. Then, as now, small American flags were placed on each grave — a tradition followed at many national cemeteries today. In recent years, the custom has grown in many families to decorate the graves of all departed loved ones.

Memorial Day was officially declared a Federal Holiday in 1967. On June 28, 1968, the Congress passed the Uniform Holidays Bill, which moved four holidays, including Memorial Day, from their traditional dates to a specified Monday in order to create a convenient three-day weekend. The change moved Memorial Day from its traditional May 30 date to the last Monday in May. The law took effect at the federal level in 1971.

 Cities and towns across the United States host Memorial Day parades each year, often incorporating military personnel and members of veterans’ organizations. Some of the largest parades take place in Chicago, New York and Washington, D.C. Americans observe Memorial Day by visiting cemeteries and memorials.

Each year on Memorial Day, a national moment of remembrance takes place at 3:00 p.m. local time.  Please take the time to remember a soldier.

Here are a few other places to read about Memorial Day happenings:

Memorial Day on Main Streethttp://mommeetsblog.wordpress.com/2012/05/27/memorial-day-on-main-street/

War Produces Heroshttp://gyatoday.wordpress.com/2012/05/27/war-produces-heros/

 Memorial Day 2012http://airportsmadesimple.com/2012/05/27/memorial-day-2012/

 A Memorial Day Tribute to My Grandfather- http://backseatwriter.wordpress.com/2012/05/25/a-memorial-day-tribute-to-my-grandfather/

Works Cited

Chicago’s Memorial Day Parade . (2012, 5 27). Retrieved from Explore Chicago The City of Chicago’s Official Tourism Site: http://www.explorechicago.org/city/en/things_see_do/event_landing/events/mose/memorial_day_parade.html

Hawks, H. (1941). Sgt. York. Retrieved 5 27, 2012, from http://www.sgtyork.org/Movie%20Stills/still6large.jpg

Historic American Sheet Music, 1850-1920 (from Duke University). (2012, May 27). Retrieved from American Memory: http://memory.loc.gov/cgi-bin/query/D?dukesm:58:./temp/~ammem_7vON::

Memorial Day. (2012, 5 27). Retrieved from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Memorial_Day

Memorial Day in New York. (2012, 5 27). Retrieved from About. Com New York City Travel: http://gonyc.about.com/od/springinnewyorkcity/a/memorial_day.htm

Military Advantage. (2012, 5 27). The History of Memorial Day. Retrieved from Military.com: http://www.military.com/memorial-day

National Memorial Day Parade. (2012, 5 27). Retrieved from http://www.nationalmemorialdayparade.com/

 

Copyright © Jamie Nowinski and Grandmother Wisdom/ Grandmother Musings 2012-2013.
Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Jamie Nowinski – Grandmother Wisdom/Grandmother Musings with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

 

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