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Tag Archives: childhood

Daddy’s Little Girl

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Daddy’s Little Girl by Al Martino     Listen by clicking the link.

I listened to the song “Daddy’s Little Girl” on 45 rpm record when I was a little girl repeatedly, every day.  I drove my mother crazy with the song and the inevitable tears that would fall with each new play.  I do not know if it was Al Martino’s voice or simply the lyrics of the song that touched some emotional switch in me to make me cry, however, sob I did.

I guess I played it so much that I cracked the record.  I still put it on the record player, crack and all.  It would skip, I would cry, and my mother would moan.  Finally, the record cracked so badly that I just had to throw it away.  It broke my heart to do it, but my mom, with her never-ending wisdom, said it would be best.

She was right, of course, because moms are always right.  I grew up and listened to other songs that made my  heart cry.  However, whenever I get a yearning, I will pull it up on my Mp3 player and give it a quick listen and a good cry.

 

Copyright © Jamie Nowinski and Grandmother Wisdom/ Grandmother Musings 2012-2013.
Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Jamie Nowinski – Grandmother Wisdom/Grandmother Musings with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.
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Where the Wild Things Are by Maurice Sendak

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Where the Wild Things AreWhere the Wild Things Are by Maurice Sendak

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Where the Wild Things Are
by Maurice Sendak

This 1964 Caldecott Medal award-winning children’s book written and illustrated by Maurice Sendak is a classic story of a boy’s boredom and imagination. Banned from libraries and schools when it was first released, Where the Wild Things Are has grown to be loved by both children and adults for its ability to visualize the realistic emotions children experience.

The book tells the story of Max, a boy who gets in trouble for goofing around in his wolf costume. His mother has had enough of his mischief-making and she sends him to his room without supper. Max is very angry at his punishment so he imagines that he leaves the safety of his room and sails out to where the wild things are. In this forest, there are gnashing beasts who wish to scare Max, however he is courageous. He stares into the beasts yellow eyes without blinking and impresses the beasts so much so that they make Max “the king of all wild things”, dancing with the monsters in a “wild rumpus”.

Max has a good time being “the king of the wild things”, but, before long, he finds that he is lonely and sails back to his bedroom. When he arrives, he finds that his dinner, still hot, is waiting for him. He is happy to be home and equally happy that he had an exciting adventure.

The book was made into a film released in 2009 and directed by Spike Jonze. The author, Maurice Sendak died on May 8, 2012, leaving a legacy of talent and imagination that will live on through his works.

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Copyright © Jamie Nowinski and Grandmother Wisdom/ Grandmother Musings 2012-2013.
Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Jamie Nowinski – Grandmother Wisdom/Grandmother Musings with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.
 

Lying Eyes

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Pinocchio was a wooden boy who made his father’s job easy.  Whenever Pinocchio lied, his nose grew longer.  If only parents and teachers had the benefit of a growing nose to warn them that a lie was coming. There are strategies that can help parents and teachers avoid the potential lies from their children and get to the truth.

1.  Avoid asking questions.  If you suspect a child of lying, do not ask questions like why? or did you?  State the act you suspect them of doing directly.

Example:  “Adam, I do not want you to swear like that, again. I am disappointed in your choice of words.  There will be no more TV for you this evening”

By making the statement, the child has less time to make up a lie. The statement catches the child off guard, and generally, he or she will admit to the act.  If the child truly did not swear, the reaction and body language will let you know that the child is innocent of the crime.

2.  Pay close attention to eye contact.  Liars will avoid direct eye contact.  One way to tell if the child is lying is to observe whether the child looks at you when you confront him or her with the offense.  If the child is young, this strategy is telling, however older children may be accomplished at lying and look you directly in the eye.  Nevertheless, there are still little telltale signs such as erratic blinking or moving the eyes from side to side to identify a lie.

3. Watch for body language.  Blushing or red flushed skin can be a sign that the child is not giving the whole truth.  Some children will touch their nose or face when they are lying, while others will fidget and wring their hands.  Lying makes people nervous and this nervousness is a good sign that something is not right.

4. Is the child being overly defensive?  Often, when a liar is confronted their first reaction is to be defensive.  The child may blame another for the infraction or try to make the adult feel guilty for asking.  This should make the adult stop and ponder what the child is trying to hide.

5. Catch the child in the act.  The best way to catch a liar is to observe them doing the act. This may take a bit of patience and time on the part of the adult, but it is a good way to stop an habitual liar when other methods are not working.

The ultimate goal of parents and teachers should be to teach the child that lying is not the answer.  If the child learns to admit when he or she has made a mistake and how to accept the consequences, the instances of lying can be eliminated as well as the unacceptable behavior.  

Copyright © Jamie Nowinski and Grandmother Wisdom/ Grandmother Musings 2012-2013.
Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Jamie Nowinski – Grandmother Wisdom/Grandmother Musings with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.
 

The Glass Castle by Jeannette Walls

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The Glass CastleThe Glass Castle by Jeannette Walls

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Jeannette Walls writes her deeply disconcerting memoir, The Glass Castle that recounts her life growing up with dysfunctional parents. Jeannette’s father was an amazingly intelligent man who could teach his four kids physics, geology, and fearlessness when he was not drunk. Jeannette’s mother was an artist who would rather get lost in her art than feed and raise her children. Mother and father were a perfect storm of two people who should never have had children. The memoir takes the reader on a tour of great ups and horrific downs for this wandering family.
From the very beginning, I was completely enthralled with this book. The story is expertly woven and easy to read. At times, the book touched a nerve, and it would make me so angry with Jeanette’s parents that I would just have to scream. This was a great book for my book club where we discussed the story with emotion and dismay. I would highly recommend this book.

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Copyright © Jamie Nowinski and Grandmother Wisdom/ Grandmother Musings 2012-2013.
Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Jamie Nowinski – Grandmother Wisdom/Grandmother Musings with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.
 

Pictures on Grandmother’s Fridge

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Colorful works of love and imagination grace the cold appliance making it appear warm and welcoming.  It is the perfect frame.  Art is viewed daily and critiqued. The art lover changes the pictures as the artist creates new works to replace the old.  Never was there a better place than Grandmother’s Fridge.

 

Copyright © Jamie Nowinski and Grandmother Wisdom/ Grandmother Musings 2012-2013.
Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Jamie Nowinski – Grandmother Wisdom/Grandmother Musings with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.
 

30 Days of Gratutude

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Day Twenty-eight: Brothers and Sisters: Today is “Sibling Day”.  Describe why you are grateful for your brother or sister. Tell us a story about something you did with your brother or sister when you were a child.

There’s a Nightmare in My Closet by Mercer Mayer

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There's a Nightmare in My ClosetThere’s a Nightmare in My Closet by Mercer Mayer

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

We can all associate with the little boy in this story. Who has not had nightmares of monsters in the closet? The cool twist of this story is that the little boy has little patience for the monster and angrily attempts to rid himself of this nightmare. Mercer Mayer’s illustrations and stories are a favorite in my family.

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Copyright © Jamie Nowinski and Grandmother Wisdom/ Grandmother Musings 2012-2013.
Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Jamie Nowinski – Grandmother Wisdom/Grandmother Musings with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.
 
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