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Memories of a Day Not Forgotten

Today on the 15th Anniversary of 9/11, many of us reminisce on where we were and what we were doing during the terrifying attack on our Country.  Unlike any other time in history, we have the ability to share our experiences on social media, instantly.  This is not only amazing, but also informative for the generations who were not alive during 9/11.  We need to tell our stories and continue to remind others that we should not forget.  remember_9_11

This is my story.  It is not extraordinary in comparison to other stories, however, a slice of an everyday person’s life on that day.

“It was sometime around 8:00 A.M. in a suburban Catholic elementary school outside of Chicago that an announcement was made over the school’s intercom.  The announcement told us to go on a hard lockdown.  This meant to lock the classroom door, turn off the lights, and close the blinds.  The students and I followed the directive quickly; once we were done, another announcement came over the intercom.  This time is was our Pastor. His voice was very sad when he told us all to stand and pray for terrible tragedy that had occurred. 

I had a terrible feeling in my stomach as I prayed with my students in tandem with our Pastor’s voice.  No one had told us what was happening. We were just praying for some unforeseen calamity.  I had seventh graders in my classroom at this time, and they were whispering and talking with fear. 

I turned on the TV attempting to find out what was going on, but it would not give us a signal.  I turned on the radio to a local radio station, and the reports of what had happened flowed from the boom box, shocking us all.  Every radio announcer was excitedly trying to understand what was happening. My class and I too, were listening very hard to the reports to piece together the story of planes crashing into the World Trade Center.

When my teacher’s aide knocked on the locked classroom door, the students and I jumped in fear.  I let her in and relocked the door. I whispered to her asking what was going on as she had been in the office and would know more information.  After hearing the facts from my aide, the fear and panic welled up once more.  My immediate concern was of my ability to keep my students safe.  I was also worried about my family. My son and daughter were both at different schools and my husband was at work.  Would I see them again?  What if this was an attack on the whole Country?  Would we be bombed? Were we safe?

The students and I were able to pull up some pictures on the Internet and some shocking news.  A few students were worried about loved ones who were either in New York or on flights to New York. Mayor Daley closed down the city of Chicago, sending thousands of people home.   Some of the students were crying, and I tried to give comfort. The Principal then came over the intercom. She carefully explained what was happening and told us all to go to the Church.  That really frightened me.  Was the world that I had known ending?

The silence in the Church and outside was eerie.  The common sound of airplanes flying to Midway Airport was gone – all airline flights cancelled. It is ironic how one misses those everyday sounds when they are gone.  All I could see was a beautiful blue cloudless sky through the open stained glass window where I sat.  The entire school stayed in the church for hours and prayed.

Later that day, when I was finally home with my family, we watched the unbelievable and the horrible events of the day on TV.  Each of us had a story of where we were and what we were doing when the planes flew into the World Trade Center, the Pentagon, and crashed into a Pennsylvania field.  It was a day none of us will forget.”

Regardless of what you believe about the events of 9/11 and who is behind this attack, the memories of how you felt that day are still relevant.  We need to share our stories in hope that a conscious effort is made toward peace. A peaceful and loving world can be had through education, compassion, communication and prayer. Blessings.

REMEMBERING 9/11

9/11 ATTACKS VIDEOS

 

Copyright © Jamie Nowinski and Grandmother Wisdom/ Grandmother Musings 9/11/2016.

 Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Jamie Nowinski – Grandmother Wisdom/Grandmother Musings with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

 

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Weekly Photo Challenge: One Shot in Two Ways

 

Smoky Mountains 2013 149

Smoky Mountains 2013 150

My recent trip to the Smokey Mountains resulted in these beautiful shots of the clouds over the peaks. The best part was driving through the misty clouds on twisty-turny roads up and down the Tennessee and North Carolina Smokeys. Clearly, this is an example of why they are called the “Smokey Mountains”.

 

Check out these other Weekly Photo Challenge interpretations:

Post Cards from Around the World…

Serendipitous Cookery

Around and About the Pacific Northwest

Javanese Wanderer

 

 

©Grandmother Musings 2012-2013.

Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Jamie Nowinski – Grandmother Wisdom/Grandmother Musings with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

America is Singing

I Hear America Singing

By Walt Whitman

 

I hear America singing, the varied carols I hear,

Those of mechanics, each singing his as it

     should be blithe and strong,

The carpenter singing his as he measures his

     plank or beam,

The mason singing his as he makes ready for

       work or leaves off work,

The boatman singing what belongs to him in his

      boat, the deck hand singing on the steam-

      boat deck,

The shoemaker singing as he sits on his bench,

     the hatter singing as he stands,

The woodcutter’s song, the ploughboy’s on his

     way in the morning, or at noon intermission

      or at sundown,

The delicious singing of the mother, or the

     young wife at work, or the girl sewing or

     washing,

Each sings what belongs to him or her and to

     none else,

The day what belongs to the day—at night the

      party of young fellows, robust, friendly,

Singing with open mouths their strong melodious

      songs.

 

Walt Whitman’s poem explores the unique contribution of each person to America. Today, there are not many shoemakers or woodcutters around, however we still sing America’s songs.  The stuff that makes this country live, breathe, and prosper.  In honor of Labor Day, we should all be proud of our role in making this country great.  It does not matter what work we do because each job is as important to the whole as another. It only matters that combined–we are one.  It is proper, therefore, that we as a nation pay tribute on Labor Day to the architects of the nation’s strength, freedom, and leadership — the American  worker.

 

Grandmother Musings 2012-2013.
Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Jamie Nowinski – Grandmother Wisdom/Grandmother Musings with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.
 

Unbroken: A World War II Story of Survival, Resilience, and Redemption by Laura Hillenbrand

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Unbroken: A World War II Story of Survival, Resilience and RedemptionUnbroken: A World War II Story of Survival, Resilience and Redemption by Laura Hillenbrand

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

This is one of the most fascinating biography books; I have ever read. Written like a fiction novel, it relates the story of Louis Zamperini, a former Olympic Track star who survives World War II as a hero.

Zamperini possesses a unique spirit and grit that allows him to survive his plane being shot down over the Pacific, 47 days adrift on a raft with two companions, and the internment in notorious Japanese POW camps. His quick mind and nimble body suffer untold horrors throughout his ordeals. Especially when Louie meets up with an evil Japanese jailor named “The Bird”.

Hillenbrand, the author, has extensively researched and interviewed Zamperini’s life. The book includes many photos, that have been saved by the Zamperini family and many illustrious stories of Louie. Laura Hillenbrand interviewed Louie 75 times and retells his life in a positive and descriptive story-like fashion.

You do not need to be a World War II buff to enjoy this amazing story of heroism, America, and survival. Read this book today!

View all my reviews

Copyright © Jamie Nowinski and Grandmother Wisdom/ Grandmother Musings 2012-2013.
Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Jamie Nowinski – Grandmother Wisdom/Grandmother Musings with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.
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