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First and Third: A lesson on Point of View

     Whenever you sit down to write a story or even when you are reading a story, point of view decides how the story is to be told.  Points of view are divided into two main groups: first-person and third-person.

     In the first-person point of view, the narrator is a character in the story that tells the story as he or she experiences or understands it.  It is easy to spot the use of first-person point of view due to the use of the pronouns: I, me, we, us, my, and our.  For example, a story begins, “I was starving and had not eaten in three days.  My stomach twisted and grumbled at my lack of food.” Is told from the first-person point of view.

     When a story is told from the first-person point of view, the reader only knows the inside of the narrator’s mind.  All other characters are given to the reader from the narrator’s perspective, what the character says, and how the character acts.  Readers have to decide from those three clues what the other characters in the story are thinking. If the narrator were a little crazy, then it would make sense that the reader is going to have a skewed vision of the other characters.

     In the third-person point of view, the narrator is not one of the characters in the story.  The narrator stand outside the story and looks in to refer to the characters as he, she, his, her, or they. When the narrator says, “He made a decision to purchase his lunch from a hot dog vendor.” It is being told from the third-person point of view.

     Within the third-person point of view, an author has the choice to choose either omniscient (ohm-nish-ent) point of view or limited omniscient point of view.  The difference is that in omniscient point of view the narrator has carte blanche and is all knowing.  He or she enters into the minds of all the characters and tells the reader all of their secret thoughts. The narrator understands everything about every character.  When an author uses limited omniscient point of view, he or she gets into the head of only a few of the characters and tells the story only from those character’s point of view.  Limited omniscient point of view can even stick to one character that the author highlights throughout the whole story.

     When writing a story it is a good idea to choose the point of view that will best compliment your characters and plot line.  If you want to keep your readers guessing, you may wish to use the first-person point of view, and if you need the reader to see the problem in the story from all the characters you may wish to use a form of third-person point of view.  Happy writing.

 

 

 

Grandmother Musings 2012-2013.
Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Jamie Nowinski – Grandmother Wisdom/Grandmother Musings with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

 

4 Reasons to Eat Breakfast

The next time you are tempted to run out the door without eating breakfast, you may want to remember that there are good reasons for stocking up on granola bars and orange juice. 

Better Immune System

People who eat breakfast consume more essential nutrients (including calcium, fiber, protein and vitamins C, B1, B2, and D) than people who do not eat in the morning.  After fasting for 6-8 hours, the digestive system is primed to easily digest the nutrients eaten at breakfast.  Generally speaking, good nutrition means better resistance to infections.  When your immune system is fueled by the morning nutrients and vitamins it is better equipped to handle the job of protecting you from colds, flu, and cancer.

You will live longer

According to the University of California, breakfast eaters may live longer than those who pass on the morning meal.   Those people who were studied show significant difference in blood sugar levels and blood pressure than those who chose not to eat in the morning.  Breakfast lovers may simply be more likely to stay in shape and exercise than their breakfast skipping counterparts.  These factors could contribute to a long life for breakfast eaters.

Brain Booster

Studies have shown that test scores improved in inner city children who ate a healthy breakfast.  According to an article at the National Institutes of Health, “Six months after the start of the free school breakfast programs, students who decreased their nutritional risk showed significantly greater: improvements in attendance and school breakfast participation, decreases in hunger, and improvements in math grades and behavior than children who did not decrease their nutritional risk.” Therefore, it seems that eating breakfast can increase attention span and boost the brain so learning can take place.

Weight Control

Eating breakfast can help maintain weight and even help in weight loss. The idea is that keeping your body fed and fueled will aid in the ability to lose weight. It helps by controlling hunger.  “When you skip breakfast, says Katherine Zeratsky, R.D., L.D. at the Mayo Clinic, you later become ravenous and are more likely to overeat.”  This can add up to weight gain.  Experts believe that skipping breakfast can add about 1 pound every seven weeks, which equals about 8 pounds a year, even if the caloric intake remains the same.

Quick Breakfast Ideas

Granola Bar and Orange Juice

Protein Shake, a Banana, and almond Milk

Yogurt, with almonds

Toast with peanut butter

 

Works Cited

A breakfast of meat and eggs or nothing at all linked to extra weight . (2003, 8 1). Retrieved from University of California: http://www.universityofcalifornia.edu/news/article/5630

Katherine Zeratsky, R. L. (2011, 7 23). Weight Loss. Retrieved from Mayo Clinic: http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/food-and-nutrition/AN01119

R.E. Kleinman, a. S.-R. (2012, 2 9). Diet, Breakfast, and Academic Performance in Children. Retrieved from National Institute of Health: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3275817/

 

Grandmother Musings 2012-2013.
Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Jamie Nowinski – Grandmother Wisdom/Grandmother Musings with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

 

The Campfires of Autumn

          The steamy, hot weather of summer has lost its kick, and the cooler fall-like weather has moved in to stay. This is the perfect time to gather the family for an evening of relaxation outdoors; it is easy to do if you have the right equipment.  With a little preparation, your campfire will be ready for roasting marshmallows in no time.

          If you are in an area where campfires are allowed (some townships have banned backyard campfires) you will want to purchase a fire pit from your local hardware store. These nifty little containers start at around $40 and can be set on your driveway or sidewalk.  A few sites on the Internet direct viewers on how to make your own fire pit.  At HGTV, instructions are given in the article, How to Make a Backyard Fire Pit; there is also a video on YouTube called Simple Backyard Fire Pit (fire pit) with Spit that may be useful for creating a campfire area.

           Once a receptacle has been secured to hold the campfire, setting it up is easy.  According to the web site, Love the Outdoors in an article named appropriately, How to Build a Campfire  a few simple steps will have you warming by the fire quickly and safely.

  • Gather wood and stack in separate piles away from fire area. Do not use green or freshly cut wood.

There are three different kinds of wood needed for a successful campfire

  • Tinder – small twigs, wood shavings, dry leaves or grass, dry needles, bark or dryer lint. This should start to burn immediately with a lighted match.

  • Kindling – small sticks 1″ around or less

  • Fuel – larger wood that keeps the fire going

DON”T FORGET ABOUT SAFETY!  Keep a bucket of water and/or a Fire Extinguisher close by to put out the fire.

Once the materials are gathered and you are ready, it is time to start the campfire.

  1. Place your tinder in the middle of a clean fire pit.  Light the tinder with a match.

  2. Once the tinder has begun to burn, slowly add the kindling.

  3. When the kindling is burning and a good fire is burning, add the fuel (Large wood) one piece at a time.

  4. To keep the fire burning, add fuel (Large wood) every so often.

          To roast a good marshmallow there needs to be hot coals in your campfire.  Watch a video entitled, How to Roast the Ultimate Marshmallow to learn the perfect tips. When you have conquered marshmallow making, you may wish to check out S’mores – How to Make S’mores for the perfect S’mores recipe.

          Singing around the campfire is a great way to enjoy the evening festivities.  At Sing Along With Me, you will find an alphabetical collection of traditional Guide, Scout, and Campfire Songs to sing.  Print out the lyrics and share them.  Make the time spent around the campfire memorable.

          The cool autumn evenings will heat up quickly when the logs burning in the campfire emit their primal warmth. Gather up your family and friends to sit around the campfire to sing some campfire songs, roast a few marshmallows, and enjoy a restful evening together. Soon the winter winds will blow and the season of campfires will be over, but with a little preparation, never forgotten.

 

Works Cited

How to Make a Backyard Fire Pit. (2012). Retrieved from HGTV:  http://www.hgtv.com/home-improvement/how-to-make-a-backyard-fire-pit/index.html 

How to Roast the Ultimate Marshmallow. (2012). Retrieved from You Tube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i5QvvnETZ7c

Simple Backyard Fire Pit (firepit) with Spit . (2012). Retrieved from YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yMpNclW0G44

Sing Along With Me. (2012). Retrieved from Songs With Music: http://songs-with-music.freeservers.com/alphabetical.html

S’mores-How To Make S’mores. (2012). Retrieved from What’s Cooking America: http://whatscookingamerica.net/Cookie/Smores/Smores.htm

 

Grandmother Musings 2012-2013.
Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Jamie Nowinski – Grandmother Wisdom/Grandmother Musings with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.
 

The Incredible Egg Carton

Egg Cartons hold those precious, delicious eggs that we eat for breakfast, add to cakes, and serve deviled at parties. When the eggs are used, do your egg cartons end up in the garbage or recycle bin?  Those nifty 12-holed cartons have more life than we think.  Check out the following ideas that will give your egg cartons uses that are more practical.

  • Wash foam cartons and use them for making ice-cubes.
  • Fill each space with a fresh basil leaf and add water. Freeze. When a recipe calls for the fresh herb, just drop in a cube.
  • Make homemade pesto with your garden ingredients. Fill the twelve spots with a tablespoon of pesto. Cut off the lid side of the carton; insert the bottom in a gallon size freezer bag, then freeze the pesto cubes. Now you can create your own sauces and dips with your homemade pesto.
  • Fit carton into high boots to help keep the boots upright and in shape.
  • With a foam carton, use the compartments for a kids painting project.
  • Store jewelry (earrings work great) in each compartment.
  • When building a project, keep your nails, screws, and other building do-dads in the compartments to avoid lost parts.
  • Cut off the lid and use the bottom compartments to sort stuff in your junk drawer.
  • Make your own campfire starter by filling each compartment of the carton with a bit of straw or newspaper, and cover with melted wax.  When the wax hardens, use one of the compartments to start the fire. If you light the straw or newspaper and add it to your kindling, the wax will melt and keep the kindling burning long enough to add large logs.
  • Use a foam or cardboard carton to start plants using seeds.
  • Store small Christmas ornaments in the carton to keep them safe.
  • The perfect snack size can be measured in 12 easy servings.  Place M&M’s, nuts, dried fruit or any small snack in each compartment. Once filled you have the perfect snack size.  Transfer to a plastic sandwich bag and now you can have a snack ready for when you are on the go.
  • Kids will love gelatin rounds. Fill a foam egg container with gelatin that has been mixed according to directions. Refrigerate until set. Pop out of the carton. Great dessert for the kids!

Do you have any egg carton uses or ideas that have not been listed?  Please share your ideas with us.

 

Related Articles

Toilet rolls & Egg cartons

How Long Should I Freeze My Food

 

 

Copyright © Jamie Nowinski and Grandmother Wisdom/ Grandmother Musings 2012-2013.
Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Jamie Nowinski – Grandmother Wisdom/Grandmother Musings with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Wedding Customs and Where They Originated

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Even though June is typically the “Wedding Month”, more and more couples are choosing non-traditional dates to “tie the knot”.  They are also concerned about keeping with the traditions that go along with getting married. Many of these traditions are deeply engrained in our culture and carry with them an interesting history of superstition, family, and of the era from which they originated.

Wedding Date

June wedding dates are historically the most popular month to marry, for it is named after the Roman Goddess of Marriage, Juno. According to legend, Juno would bring prosperity and happiness to all who wed in her month.  In the past, common sense also played a part in a bride’s decision to marry in June. If she marries in the early part of summer, the bride’s first child would likely arrive in spring, giving her time to recover before the fall harvest.

According to an article in “The Examiner” written by Marguerite Wright, “June was considered the time when people came outdoors after a long winter and bathed communally. This would be the best time for a fresh smelling bride.” Celebrations could be planned without the threat of acclimate weather and family could travel to attend the wedding.

Brides were also superstitious about the day of the week.  An old poem goes:

Marry on Monday for health,

Tuesday for wealth,

Wednesday the best day of all,

Thursday for crosses,

Friday for losses,

and Saturday for no luck at all.

The Sabbath day was out of the question.

Wedding Dress

The tradition of wearing a white or ivory wedding dress comes from Victorian Age (1837-1901).  White or ivory wedding dresses worn by the rich, who could afford to wear a dress only once, were in vogue.  It was also considered a sign of purity and virginity.

A black wedding dress was considered taboo in the past, however, today black, and many other colors have been added to the selections. Vera Wang, a popular fashion designer, displayed only black wedding dresses in her 2012 collection. David’s Bridal reports that colored dresses have begun to come into fashion for younger brides.

A Wedding Dress poem steeped in superstition, but something to think about before the wedding.

Married in white, you will have chosen right.  

Married in grey, you will go far away.

Married in black, you will wish yourself back.

Married in red, you wish yourself dead.

Married in green, ashamed to be seen.

Married in blue, you will always be true.

Married in pearl, you will live in a whirl.

Married in yellow, ashamed of your fellow.

Married in brown, you will live out-of-town.

Married in pink, your fortune will sink.

 

The Veil and the Bridesmaids

The reason and purpose for a veil for the Bride and her Bridesmaids comes for the ancient belief that evil spirits were lurking at the wedding and trying to steal the soul of the Bride. If the Bride wears a veil, as well as her Bridesmaids, the evil spirits will be confused and not know whom to choose.  Essentially, the Bridesmaids were put in place to protect the Bride and ensure that her soul was pure when she was given to her Groom.

 

Other Superstitions and Customs

Something Old,

Something New,

Something Borrowed,

Something Blue

Many Brides’ have searched frantically before the Wedding Day to find an item to fit each of the items in this phrase.  This poem came from Ancient Roman symbolism.  “Something Old…” means continuing with the past; “Something New…” was the sign of future prosperity; “Something Borrowed…” usually came from another happy couple to ensure that their happiness would rub off on the newlyweds and that they would also be happy together; “Something Blue…” was associated with purity, fidelity, and true love.

The superstition of carrying the Bride over the threshold by the groom stems from those evil spirits lurking, again. Even today in Eastern Europe, the wedding guests still escort the bride and groom to their bedroom.  Some cultures will dance around the house of the newlyweds to drive away any demons that may be hanging around.

With all these ceremonies and banishing of evil spirits, it is a wonder married couples ever have troubles or divorce. It could be that in modern times, many of these superstitions and customs have fallen to the wayside.  Couples today are choosing to buck the tradition and marry in their own way.  Imagine what our ancestors would have believed about couples who choose to marry on Halloween or on Friday the 13th.  Talk about your evil spirits!  Nevertheless, the ceremony of marriage is still thought to be a time to celebrate and an occasion to wish the couple a happy life.

 

Related Articles

 A Brief History of Weddings

Something Blue

Wedding Traditions: Something Old, New, Borrowed, and Blue

 

Works Cited

American Wedding Traditions and Customs. (2012). Retrieved from Elite Dresses.com: http://www.elitedresses.com/American_Wedding_Customs_s/63.htm

Kitsen, M. L. (1998, May). How Wedding Customs Got Their Start. Women’s Day.

McIntyre, K. (2012). The History of the White Wedding Dress. Retrieved from From Times Past .com: http://www.fromtimespast.com/wedding.htm

Odell, A. (2011, 10 28). Just How Popular Are Colored Wedding Dresses? Retrieved from New York Fashion Magazine: http://nymag.com/daily/fashion/2011/10/colored_wedding_dresses.html

Wright, M. (2006-2012). Why June is the time for weddings and the best spas for brides. Retrieved from The Examiner.com: http://www.examiner.com/article/why-june-is-the-time-for-weddings-and-the-best-spas-for-brides

 

Copyright © Jamie Nowinski and Grandmother Wisdom/ Grandmother Musings 2012-2013.
Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Jamie Nowinski – Grandmother Wisdom/Grandmother Musings with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.
 
 

 

 

 

 

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bigsmileu1:

Anytime I can find more resources to help me in the blogging world, I grab them and run!  Check out this recent post for great information about More Widgets for you Blog.

Related Article

Customizing With Widgets

 

 

Copyright © Jamie Nowinski and Grandmother Wisdom/ Grandmother Musings 2012-2013.
Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Jamie Nowinski – Grandmother Wisdom/Grandmother Musings with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Originally posted on WordPress.com News:

Everyone loves widgets right? They allow you to add neat features to your blog and really make it your own. They are universal, because you can use them on all different themes, so no matter which theme you’ve used to represent your own personal style, widgets can help you round out the features that make your blog tick. Some of WordPress.com’s newer features like Following and Liking have needed some widget-love, so we’ve whipped up a few new ones to help you out. All of these widgets can be used immediately and added to one of your sidebars under Appearance → Widgets.

Blogs I Follow

The first widget, named Blogs I Follow, allows you to display a list of the blogs that you are following via the WordPress.com Reader. You can display the list as a grid of images representing the blogs or just a series of links. This…

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Quotes From the Masters: Hugo

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Marigolds

Marigolds make great companions to other plants in your garden. Just ask any farmer or gardener and they will tell you to plant marigolds to keep those pesky rabbits and annoying insects out of your prized vegetables.  The pests hate the smell.  Nematodes (microscopic worms) and other organisms run from the marigold’s roots underground, and they will stay away for up to three years.

No annual is easier to grow than marigolds.  They are a cheerful plant that is hardy and will typically grow anywhere, but like well-drained soil the best.  They will bloom all season long right up to the first snowfall in some cases.  Marigolds are generally, yellow, orange and red, and are a perfect tribute to your fall garden.

According to Herbalists at MDidea Extracts, “The marigold or Calendula flower was well-known to the old herbalists as a garden flower that also could be used for culinary or healing practices. It has been cultivated in the kitchen garden for the flowers, which are dried for broth, and said to comfort the heart and spirits.”

During the American Civil War, field doctors used the flowers of the marigold to accelerate healing in open wounds, promote blood clotting, cleanse the tissue, and prevent infection. The practice of using marigolds to heal soldiers continued until World War I. 

The Old Farmer’s Almanac shares some “Wit & Wisdom” about marigolds in its 2012 edition by telling how, in the late 1960s, Burpee president David Burpee launched an energetic campaign to have marigolds named the national flower, but in the end, roses won out.  In addition, they explain that for years, farmers have included the open-pollinated African marigold ‘Crackerjack’ in chicken feed to make egg yolks a darker yellow.

In short, Victor Hugo is correct when he states “Nature, like a kind and smiling mother, lends herself to our dreams and cherishes our fancies.”  For the marigold smiles at us with her beautiful buds of sunshine, protects our dreams of good food and health, and can adorn any patio with pure fancy.

******* Please Visit Bringing Europe Home to view more “Quotes From The Masters”

Works Cited

Marigolds: how to Plant, Care, and Grow Marigolds. (2012). Retrieved from Old Farmer’s Almanac: http://www.almanac.com/plant/marigolds

What is Marigold or Calendula extract? (2010, Dec. 1). Retrieved from MDidea Extracts Professional: http://www.mdidea.com/products/herbextract/marigold/data06.html

Why Plant Marigolds in your Vegetable Garden? (2007, Dec 7). Retrieved from ToadStool Aquaponics: http://toadstoolponds.wordpress.com/2007/12/07/why-plant-marigolds-in-your-vegetable-garden/

 

Copyright © Jamie Nowinski and Grandmother Wisdom/ Grandmother Musings 2012-2013.
Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Jamie Nowinski – Grandmother Wisdom/Grandmother Musings with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

 

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